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Tag Archives: Digital Government

Have any evaluations coming up?

Have any evaluations coming up?

Spring is a time for renewal, growth, and of course, government contracting.

As we move into the heart of the procurement season, many of you are busy developing new procurements and will be managing evaluations as the proposals come in.

The evaluation phase brings with it a whole new set of pressures:

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Acquisition in the crosshairs amid DOD restructuring

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Acquisition in the crosshairs amid DOD restructuring

Via fcw.com by Amber Corrin

The Defense Department is facing significant challenges and changes in the coming months and years, and with a mandate to streamline and cut spending, acquisition is emerging as a critical area. DOD officials expect to see big changes in acquisition, whether they involve reforming how the military buys its weapons, IT, services and other goods; improving the workforce in charge of purchasing; or handing off certain responsibilities.

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Two bills look to give small business an edge in contracting

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Two bills look to give small business an edge in contracting

Via fcw.com by Adam Mazmanian

House Small Business Committee, is introducing a pair of bills Feb. 26 designed to increase small firms’ participation in federal contracting and improve the quality of contracting data. The Greater Opportunities for Small Business Act would raise the percentage of small businesses among prime federal contract recipients from 23 percent to 25 percent, and the percentage of subcontract recipients to not less than 40 percent of the total.

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How to Protest Proof your Evaluations

How to Protest Proof your Evaluations

Contract protests are on the rise—with sustained protests more than doubling over the past 5 years.  From anecdotal evidence, it appears that over the past 1-2 years, they have gone up even more.  Among the agencies we meet with, we are hearing stories of up to half of acquisitions being protested when the dollar amounts are high and especially in IT.  It seems what was once taboo is now just a normal cost of doing business.

If this is the new normal in government acquisitions, then agencies would be wise to plan for this also.  I propose that you build ‘protest planning’ into your evaluations as well.

What does this look like?

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Protests have doubled over the past 5 years—what’s an agency to do?

Protests have doubled over the past 5 years—what’s an agency to do?

According to a 2012 GAO Protest Report, the number of sustained protests on federal procurements have doubled over the past 5 years.  Protests can cause an immense amount of stress and strain on any agency, as they are forced to put a halt to important projects and devote their time and resources to gathering materials, conducting forensics, and responding to questions from investigators.  How can agencies reduce the chance that they will end up in a costly protest?

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Why aren’t we meeting small business goals?

Why aren’t we meeting small business goals?

Agencies are required to meet small business contracting goals but every year, it is only a small percentage that actually comes close.   Why is this?  One very simple reason is that information on qualified small businesses does not flow to the CORs who are conducting market research.

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GAO finds motifs in successful IT projects

GAO finds motifs in successful IT projects

Via Federal technology news and events by Scott Maucione

A Government Accountability Office study released Nov. 14 examined seven successfully acquired government IT investments and found certain concepts used in at least three of the acquisitions.

The common factors found in successful projects included program officials being actively engaged with stakeholders, which garnered use by all seven projects. Surprisingly, only three of the projects reported receiving sufficient funding.

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IT Procurement Reform Comes with a Price Tag: $145 Million

IT Procurement Reform Comes with a Price Tag: $145 Million

Via nextgov.com by Katherine McIntire Peters

A bipartisan bill aimed at reforming the way agencies buy information technology would cost $145 million to implement through 2018, the Congressional Budget Office has determined.

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IT Industry Council suddenly becomes a player in acquisition policy

Via FederalNewsRadio.com by Jason Miller

The Information Technology Industry Council made a big splash in the federal community Tuesday by adding muscle to its lobbying and policy efforts.

ITIC grabbed four top executives from a rival association and launched a new public sector practice.

TechAmerica lost in one fell swoop Trey Hodgkins, senior vice president global public sector; Erica McCann, manager of procurement policy; Carol Henton, vice president of state and local government division; and Pam Walker, senior director for homeland security. All four took similar roles with ITIC’s new IT Alliance for Public Sector organization, which will focus on technology and acquisition issues.

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6 Trends Driving Change in Government

Via govexec.com by Dan Chenok, IBM Center for the Business of Government

IBM’s Center for the Business of Government recently to released a report detailing six trends driving change in government. The new report is premised on the fact that government is in the midst of significant changes that have both near-term con­sequences and lasting impact. Such changes become more complex in nature and more uncertain in effect. At the same time, the demands on government continue to grow while the collective resources available to meet such demands are increasingly con­strained.

Government leaders, managers, and stakeholders face major challenges, including fiscal austerity, citizen expecations, the pace of technology and innovation, and a new role for governance.   These challenges influence how government executives lead today, and, more impor­tantly, how they can prepare for the future.  The report is intended to help paint a path forward in responding to the ever-increasing complexity that government faces today and into the future.

Read more here.

 

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